50 Shades

Many of Eilidh’s various medical tests are monotonous.  This is not to take away from the fact that we are privileged in this country to have such thorough health care for Eilidh.  And it is of course no reflection on the amazing professionals that patiently put up with us and our frequent stupid questions.  It’s just that nothing is ever conclusive.  If her results were any more grey they would be… well, black – but that’s probably not the analogy i’m looking for.

One of my least favourite appointments is with Audiology.  Eilidh has had more hearing tests in her 3 years than is fair on one little girl.  Every test is inconclusive.  We were always heading in the direction that Eilidh would need a hearing aid.  She has particularly narrow ear canals and being the snotty, bunged up monster that she is, the likelihood is that she will need some form of hearing support.

You talking to me daddy?!!

You talking to me daddy?!!

That is until this weeks appointment where she responded to all the tests positively.  Hearing tests for children are a surreal experience.  You are locked in a soundproof room with various outlandish visual and audio stimuli.  It is like something Andy Warhol and John Lennon might have created together in one of their more enlightened moments.  I would not recommend attending one with a hangover.

Anyway, she passed.  Sort of.  She responded in some way to all the audio signals during the test.  They would have liked her to have repeated her response a few times but she didn’t.  I put this down to her being disinterested in the repeated signals.  Once you’ve seen one dancing dog eminating alien-like warbles, you’ve seen them all.  It’s either a lack of interest in repetition and routine (like her daddy) or downright stubborness (like her mummy) – but either way she didn’t want to play ball.

The consultant felt that a hearing aid at this point is probably not necessary.  Although at the last appointment, 4 weeks ago, they suggested that she probably would need one.  We also have to go back at the end of the summer to check whether she might need one then.  So, conclusively inconclusive.

In my view Eilidh has no hearing problems.  She can hear a sweetie wrapper from a hundred yards and she can hear when Peppa Pig comes on at the other end of the house.  The audiologists say that as parents we probably know better than any test whether our children have hearing difficulties and that we should trust our instincts.

Funnily enough, Eilidh often doesn’t hear rules or instructions from me or Lynn. My instinct tells me she’s up to mischief on this one!

Dave

20th May 2016

3 responses to “50 Shades

  1. Hi Dave
    I picked up the paper this morning and read your article in the Daily record. I have to say it really was a pleasure to read and a good start to the day. Its a lovely blog you have created in sharing the experience of having a child with downs syndrome and your openness is to be commended.

    We also have two children, our daughter Jessica who is 5 and in P1 and our son Alexander who has downs syndrome, he is now 7. At the start myself and my wife Wendy felt all the emotions yourself and your wife did and had so many questions with no definitive answers. We were pretty scared of what to expect and it was impossible to think to far ahead, even to where Alexander is at now and what i have realised is that we as parents adapt very well necause you are there for each other. In the early days, there was always the urge to connect with people who had been in your shoes as if they had all the answers and were somehow capable of telling you how it was going to be. Alexander keeps well, he attends Isobel Mair School in Newton Mearns which is for kids with additional support needs and he loves it. He has all the interest of other kids, may be just not the attention or perseverance but he does try and we are so proud of him and his sister who at such a young age realises that her bro needs a helping hand now and again, she is an amazing little person.

    We always seem to talk about getting in touch with Down’s syndrome Scotland but never seem tonget round to it….after reading the article today we will be finding out more this week

    Look forward to readjng your blog in the future,

    Best regards

    Stuart Guthrie

    • Hi Stuart, thanks for sending your comment and its good to hear you enjoyed the article.. bit daunting having my thoughts out there in a national paper!

      I can relate to what you’re saying about the how amazing Jessica is.. Eilidh’s brother Rory is the best big brother she could have and helps us look after her.. he’s more patient than I am!!

      Definitely get in touch with DS Scotland.. they are an amazing group of people!

      Thanks again,
      Dave

  2. Hi Stuart, thanks for sending your comment and its good to hear you enjoyed the article.. bit daunting having my thoughts out there in a national paper!

    I can relate to what you’re saying about the how amazing Jessica is.. Eilidh’s brother Rory is the best big brother she could have and helps us look after her.. he’s more patient than I am!!

    Definitely get in touch with DS Scotland.. they are an amazing group of people!

    Thanks again,
    Dave

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *